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Different countries, different organ sounds. Why?


I have found a research of the well-known Spanish-German organ builder Gerhard Grenzing about the different organ stop sounds relating it to the language:

https://www.grenzing.com/pdf/klang.pdf

In relation to the unfortunate fire of Nôtre Dame you can see also the restauration process (pdf) of a Cavaillé-Coll organ in Burgos (Spain) severely damaged in a fire on April 21, 2001:

https://www.grenzing.com/organosshow.cfm?id=21&ip=21

I hope you find it interesting.




by biogon
Apr 18, 2019 05:49 AM

Replies (1)

RE: Different countries, different organ sounds. Why?

biogon wrote:

I have found a research of the well-known Spanish-German organ builder Gerhard Grenzing about the different organ stop sounds relating it to the language:

https://www.grenzing.com/pdf/klang.pdf

In relation to the unfortunate fire of Nôtre Dame you can see also the restauration process (pdf) of a Cavaillé-Coll organ in Burgos (Spain) severely damaged in a fire on April 21, 2001:

https://www.grenzing.com/organosshow.cfm?id=21&ip=21

I hope you find it interesting.




One reason is wood. Wood grows at different rates over the years centuries etc...an oak in the UK may procure a softer wood that say a Spanish oak because of the growing season, water, sunlight it received in life so for wooden flues you could expect those deviations. However I read that the voicing of current organs are based on how technology has improved from its Arabic birth to the behemoth that they have some now. Over time certain organ builders begin to set their tone so e that if you heard a Cavallie Coll you’d know that was that type of organ. English organs are different to their European counterparts. The organist as in say Diana Bish will want a certain sound for the organ... the blower(s) vibrato etc......

by dreece1
Apr 27, 2019 07:48 PM

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